Leila Roy

Leila Roy is a fictional character from the long-running Channel 4 soap opera Hollyoaks, played by Lena Kaur. The character made her first appearance in June 2008. In November 2009, it was announced that Kaur had decided to leave Hollyoaks. Lena made her last appearance as Leila in January 2010.

Leila was born in 1989 to Govinda and Bel Roy. She is their eldest daughter and sister to Ash, Ravi and Anita. Leila, a keen artist, had told her father that she was at college studying a law course in order to retrieve his dream of her becoming a lawyer. When Leila was four, Gov and Bel adopted Anita, who Leila grew up believing to be her sister.
Regular role auditions were held for the part of Leila with actress Lena Kaur securing the role. In November 2009, it was announced that Kaur would leave the soap. Speaking of her decision, Kaur stated: „I decided to leave a while ago because I wanted to do something else. It’s the same with every soap – you don’t get time to rehearse, there are ups and down and it’s so quick to film. You learn all the technical side of things, which is fabulous but for me, I want to move on. It seems like a good time to go as projects are being commissioned that are big for Asian actors – the casting world is moving forward. Young Asian actors are being cast in lead roles in which the characters are who they are regardless of their skin colour. Casting’s definitely on a turn compared to what it was five or ten years ago.“
Leila is kind, generous and forgiving. She is a firm believer in the spirit world, karma and horoscopes and on several occasions, has used her horoscope to envision her life. In August 2008, Lena Kaur praised Hollyoaks producer Bryan Kirkwood for not stereotyping Asians on the programme. Speaking to Take 5 magazine, she stated, „The storylines for me and Stephen (Ravi) aren’t being dictated by the colour of our skin prada zonnebril 2016. We’re both British Asians in real life as well as in the show. We are both totally westernised. We’ve been brought up in Britain, so the storylines will reflect people like Stephen and me.“
Leila arrives as a student at Hollyoaks Community College, where she moves into the halls of residence. Shortly after arriving, Leila begins to develop feelings for Justin Burton, which she tells friend Nancy Hayton. Leila accidentally knocks Justin over. He hits his head and is knocked unconscious. One of the nurses at the hospital tells Leila that Justin has lost his memory. Leila then pretends to be Justin’s girlfriend when he leaves hospital. At a party, Justin’s friend Ste Hay tells him that Leila is making their relationship up. Justin decides to go along with it and gets back at her by making her do housework. Justin then proposes to a shocked Leila prada tassen 2016, he then admits to knowing she is lying and reveals he has not lost his memory.
Leila has fun with Gilly Roach and they share a kiss, which makes Justin jealous. Gilly and Leila go on date, but are forced to take Archie Carpenter and Rhys Ashworth with them. Leila then turns down Gilly and starts a relationship with Justin, who finally realises feelings towards Leila. Leila begins to sleepwalk, which is discovered when she is caught on camera eating her own chocolates from an advent calendar. The novelty of Leila and Justin’s relationship begins to ware off when Justin realises his true feelings for Hannah Ashworth. During Sasha Valentine and Josh Ashworth’s joint birthday party, Justin kisses Hannah and is seen by Hannah’s boyfriend Ash and Elliot Bevan, who has developed feelings for Leila. Leila and Elliot kiss outside and are seen by Ash. Elliot tells Leila he wants to start a relationship, as Justin does with Hannah, however Leila feels guilty and continues her relationship with Justin. Justin the splits up with Leila, who then helps him ask out Hannah. Leila and Elliot share a kiss, their love for each other and begin a relationship.
Leila begins feeling ill. When Elliot takes her for a romantic picnic, Leila, who is still ill, appears uninterested, prompting Elliot to believe she has lost interest in their relationship. After a confrontation, Leila tells Elliot she thinks she may be pregnant. Elliot runs off, worrying he would be a bad father like his own. He tries to avoid Leila, who claims to have taken a pregnancy test. Elliot returns and she reveals she is in fact pregnant. Elliot then runs out again. Leila tracks him down and tells him she never took the test and wanted to see how Elliot would react. With a strain already on their relationship, Leila takes a test and discovers she is not pregnant, to the relief of the pair. Leila contacts Elliot’s father Gareth, however Kris Fisher tells her that Elliot does not want anything to do with his father. Leila then gets Elliot and Kris to take some of her art to a gallery, in order for her to tell Gareth to leave when he arrives. Gareth turns up just as Elliot prepares to leave for the gallery, however he assumes Gareth is a delivery man. Finally the truth comes out and Elliot is angry at Leila for interfering. Leila grows suspicious of Gareth, whose relationship with Elliot has grown. She discovers Elliot’s half brother Maynard is in fact the same age as Elliot and not fourteen as Gareth had said. Realising Gareth is lying to Elliot and had obviously cheated on Elliot’s mother Bonnie, Leila calls her. After Gareth leaves, Elliot rejects Leila.
Leila, Bel, Loretta, Kris and Anita discover Ravi is involved in an illegal fight, which could cause his aneurysm to rupture. Angry Ravi taunts Ash, who then punches him. Ravi falls into a coma and Leila blames Ash, who tries to apologise. Ash tells Anita that she is adopted and manipulates her into keeping quiet. When Anita tells Gov she knows, Leila is shocked that her family lied to her and Anita. The Roys then disown Ash. Leila tells Gilly that Ash had hidden food in Hannah Ashworth’s room to make it look like her eating disorder had returned, Ash then leaves Hollyoaks. Leila ends her relationship with Elliot and has a one-night stand with Archie Carpenter, who later asks her out but she declines. When Bel and Gov move away to Middlesbrough, Leila, Ravi and Anita move into a smaller flat, previously occupied by the Cunningham family. Leila begins to worry Anita has an eating disorder after a confrontation from Hannah. However, Anita is pretending for attention. Leila overhears Anita and Theresa McQueen talking 2016 hermes schoenen, and believes Anita has lost her virginity. Anita then pretends she has, due to Leila treating her more like an adult. When Anita collapses due to taking MDMA, Leila and Ravi believe Dave Colburn spiked her drink. However, Anita admits she took it herself to impress him.
Leila creates a sculpture as part of an exhibition. During an interview for a job with artist Jack Welsh, she is told the job is in Paris 2016 hermes schoenen. Not knowing whether to take the opportunity, Leila confides in Elliot, and the pair grow close again, much to the dislike of his girlfriend Sheila Buxton. Anita accidentally smashes Leila’s sculpture during a party, possibly ruining her chance for the job. However, Anita and Ravi Roy reconstruct her sculpture and she is then offered the job. Initially she is reluctant because of her feelings for Elliot, however he persuades her to move on, and she decides to leave. After a tearful farewell with Ravi and Anita, Leila leaves.

Hoplite

Hoplites were citizen-soldiers of Ancient Greek city-states who were primarily armed with spears and shields. Their main tactic was the phalanx formation. The hoplites were primarily free citizens—propertied farmers and artisans—who were able to afford the bronze armor suit and weapons (estimated at a third to a half of its able-bodied adult male population). Hoplites generally received basic military training.
In the 8th or 7th century BC Greek armies adopted a military innovation known as the phalanx formation. This tactic proved successful in defeating the Persians when employed by the Athenians at the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC during the First Greco-Persian War. The Persian archers and light troops who fought in the Battle of Marathon failed, in part, because their bows were too weak for their arrows to penetrate the Greek shields and armor, and their own armor and shields could not stand up to the longer spears and swords of the Greeks. The phalanx was also successfully employed by the Greeks at the Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC and at the Battle of Plataea in 479 BC during the Second Greco-Persian War.
The word hoplite (Greek: ὁπλίτης hoplitēs; pl. ὁπλῖται hoplitai) derives from hoplon (ὅπλον, plural hopla ὅπλα), the type of shield used by the soldiers. There is however considerable debate about this as the shield was more commonly known as an aspis.
Although, as a word, hopla could also denote the soldiers‘ weapons or even their full armament. In the modern Hellenic Army, the word hoplite (Greek: oπλίτης) is used to refer to an infantryman.

The exact time when hoplitic warfare was developed is uncertain, the prevalent theory being that it was established sometime during the 8th or 7th century BC, when the „heroic age was abandoned and a far more disciplined system introduced“ and the Argive shield became popular. Peter Krentz argues that „the ideology of hoplitic warfare as a ritualized contest developed not in the 7th century [BC], but only after 480, when non-hoplite arms began to be excluded from the phalanx“. Anagnostis Agelarakis, based on recent archaeo-anthropological discoveries of the earliest monumental polyandrion (communal burial of male warriors) at Paros Island in Greece, unveils a last quarter of the 8th century BC date for a hoplitic phalangeal military organization.
The rise and fall of hoplite warfare was tied to the rise and fall of the city-state. As discussed above, hoplites were a solution to the armed clashes between independent city-states. As Greek civilization found itself confronted by the world at large, particularly the Persians, the emphasis in warfare shifted. Confronted by huge numbers of enemy troops rabatt Puma fotballsko cleats utløp 2016, individual city-states could not realistically fight alone. During the Greco-Persian Wars (499–448 BC), alliances between groups of cities (whose composition varied over time) fought against the Persians. This drastically altered the scale of warfare and the numbers of troops involved. The hoplite phalanx proved itself far superior to the Persian infantry at such conflicts as the Battle of Marathon, Thermopylae, and the Battle of Plataea.
During this period, Athens and Sparta rose to a position of political eminence in Greece, and their rivalry in the aftermath of the Persian wars brought Greece into renewed internal conflict. However, the Peloponnesian War was on a scale unlike conflicts before. Fought between leagues of cities, dominated by Athens and Sparta respectively, the pooled manpower and financial resources allowed a diversification of warfare. Hoplite warfare was in decline; there were three major battles in the Peloponnesian War, and none proved decisive. Instead there was increased reliance on navies, skirmishers, mercenaries, city walls, siege engines, and non-set piece tactics. These reforms made wars of attrition possible and greatly increased the number of casualties. In the Persian war, hoplites faced large numbers of skirmishers and missile-armed troops, and such troops (e.g., peltasts) became much more commonly used by the Greeks during the Peloponnesian War. As a result, hoplites began wearing less armour, carrying shorter swords, and in general adapting for greater mobility; this led to the development of the ekdromos light hoplite.
Many famous personalities, philosophers, artists, and poets fought as hoplites.
Sparta is one of the most famous city-states, along with Athens, which had a unique position in ancient Greece. Contrary to other city states, the free citizens of Sparta served as hoplites their entire life, training and exercising also in peacetime, which gave Sparta a professional standing army. Although small, numbering no more than 1,500 to 2,000 men,[citation needed] divided into six mora or battalions, the Spartan army was feared for its discipline and ferocity. Military service was the primary duty of Spartan men, and Spartan society was organized around its army.
Young boys were sent to military school at the age of 7 until the age of 21 when they became full soldiers and moved into their own barracks. These boys who made it endured physical, mental, and spiritual training throughout their education. It is said they were often instructed by their teachers to fight one another. Since the Spartan diet was meagre and not very tasty, stealing food was a necessity, and when caught, the boy would be punished for being captured rather than for stealing. Their graduation included having to live in the wild for a week and killing an aggressive wild animal.[citation needed]
Military service for hoplites lasted until the age of 40, and sometimes even until 60 years of age, depending on a man’s physical ability to perform on the battlefield.
Later on in the hoplite era, more sophisticated tactics were developed, in particular by the Theban general Epaminondas. These tactics inspired the future king Philip II of Macedon, who was at the time a hostage in Thebes, and also inspired the development of new kind of infantry, the Macedonian phalanx. After the Macedonian conquests of the 4th century BC, the hoplite was slowly abandoned in favour of the phalangite, armed in the Macedonian fashion, in the armies of the southern Greek states. Although clearly a development of the hoplite, the Macedonian phalanx was tactically more versatile, especially used in the combined arms tactics favoured by the Macedonians. These forces defeated the last major hoplite army, at the Battle of Chaeronea (338 BC), after which Athens and its allies joined the Macedonian empire.
While Alexander’s army mainly fielded Pezhetairoi (= Foot Companions) as his main force, it is known that his army also included some classic hoplites, either provided by the League of Corinth or from hired mercenaries. Beside these units the Macedonians also used the so-called Hypaspists, an elite force of units possibly originally fighting as hoplites and used to guard the exposed right wing of Alexander’s phalanx.
The hoplite-style warfare was very influential and influenced several other nations in the Mediterranean. So was the hoplite warfare the dominant fighting style on the Italian Peninsula up to the early 3rd century BC, namely by the Etruscans and the Early Roman army. The Romans later changed their fighting style to a more flexible Maniple organization, and reequipped their soldiers with longer oval shields (scutum), swords and heavy javelins (pilum). In the end only the triarii would keep a long spear (hasta) as their main weapon. Though the Italian tribes, namely the socii fighting with the Romans, later adopted the new Roman fighting style, some continued to fight as hoplites. Local levied troops or mercenaries serving under Pyrrhus of Epirus or Hannibal (namely Etruscans) where equipped and fought as hoplites.
Other nations with hoplite-style troops would be Ancient Carthage which equipped its troops in the beginning, like the Sacred Band of Carthage, as Greek hoplites. Many Greek hoplite mercenaries also fought in foreign armies, like Carthage or even the Persian Achaemenid Empire, where it is believed by some that they inspired the formation of the Cardaces. Some hoplites served under the Illyrian king Bardylis in the 4th century. The Illyrians where known to import many weapons and tactics from the Greeks.
The Diadochi imported the Greek phalanx to their kingdoms. Thou they mostly fielded Greek citizens or mercenaries they also armed and drilled local natives as hoplites or rather Macedonian phalanx, like the Machimoi of the Ptolemaic army.
The Greek armies of the Hellenistic period mostly fielded troops in the fashion of the Macedonian phalanx. Nonetheless many armies of Mainland Greece stuck with hoplite warfare. Besides classical hoplites Hellenistic nations began to field two new types of hoplites, the Thureophoroi and the Thorakitai. They developed when Greeks adopted the Celtic Thureos shield, of an oval shape that was similar to the shields of the Romans, but flatter. The Thureophoroi were armed with a long thrusting spear, a short sword and, if needed, javelins. While the Thorakitai were similar to the Thureophoroi, they were more heavily armoured, as their name implies, usually wearing a mail shirt. These troops were used as a link between the light infantry and the phalanx, a form of medium infantry to bridge the gaps.
The fragmentary nature of Ancient Greece, with many competing city-states, increased the frequency of conflict, but conversely limited the scale of warfare. Limited manpower did not allow most Greek city-states to form large armies which could operate for long periods, especially in the case of light troops like the psiloi, who were recruited from the lower citizen classes, and as such, were mainly farmers, workers, even slaves.[citation needed] They were expected to take part in any military campaign when they would be called for duty. The Lacedaemonian citizens of Sparta were renowned for their lifelong combat training and almost mythical military prowess, while their greatest adversaries, the Athenians, were exempted from service only after the 60th year of their lives. This inevitably reduced the potential duration of campaigns, as a large portion of any Greek army would need to return to their own professions as farmers and artisans. Campaigns would therefore often be restricted to summer. Armies marched directly to their target, the battlefield having possibly already been agreed on by the contestants.
If battle was refused by the defender, they would generally retreat to their city, in which case the attackers generally had to content themselves with ravaging the surrounding countryside, since siegecraft was not efficient, at least until the 5th century BC.[citation needed] When battles occurred, they were usually set piece and intended to be decisive. The battlefield would be flat and open to facilitate phalanx warfare. These battles were usually short and required a high degree of discipline. At least in the early classical period, cavalry was usually used to protect the flanks, when present at all, and cover a possible retreat. Light infantry and missile troops took part in the battle, but their role was of a lower importance.
The military structure created by the Spartans was a rectangular phalanx formation. The formation was organized from eight to ten rows deep, stretching down for about a quarter of a mile or more with well heavily armed fighters fighting in a unit. The phalanxes would approach each other in a steady 2016 Adidas fotball utstyr online, slow march to keep cohesion or rarely at a run,[citation needed] if the enemy was prone to panic, or if they fought against enemies equipped with bows, as was the case with the Persians at the Battle of Marathon. The two lines would remain at a small distance to be able to effectively use their spears, while the psiloi threw stones and javelins from behind their lines. If the doratismos (spear combat) was not decisive, then the lines would close and swords would be drawn.[citation needed] The shields would clash and the first lines (protostates) would stab at their opponents, at the same time trying to keep in position. The ranks behind them would support them with their own spears and the mass of their shields gently pushing them, not to force them into the enemy formation but to keep them steady and in place.[citation needed] At certain points, a command would be given to the phalanx or a part thereof to collectively take a certain number of steps forward (ranging from half to multiple steps). This was the famed othismos.[citation needed][dubious – discuss]
At this point, the phalanx would put its collective weight to push back the enemy line and thus create fear and panic among its ranks. There could be multiple such instances of attempts to push, but it seems from the accounts of the ancients that these were perfectly orchestrated and attempted organized en masse.[citation needed] Battles rarely lasted more than an hour.[citation needed] Once one of the lines broke, the troops would generally flee from the field, sometimes chased by psiloi, peltasts, or light cavalry.
If a hoplite escaped, he would sometimes be forced to drop his cumbersome aspis, thereby disgracing himself to his friends and family (becoming a ripsaspis, one who threw his shield). To lessen the amount of casualties inflicted by the enemy during battles, soldiers were positioned to stand shoulder to shoulder with their hoplon. Casualties were slight compared to later battles, rarely amounting to more than 5% of the losing side,[citation needed] but the slain often included the most prominent citizens and generals who led from the front. Thus, the whole war could be decided by a single field battle; victory was enforced by ransoming the fallen back to the defeated Billige Nike Fotball Jerseys online 2016, called the „Custom of the Greeks“.[clarification needed]
Individual hoplites carried their shields on their left arm, protecting not only themselves but also the soldier to the left. This meant that the men at the extreme right of the phalanx were only half-protected. In battle, opposing phalanxes would exploit this weakness by attempting to overlap the enemy’s right flank.[citation needed] It also meant that, in battle, a phalanx would tend to drift to the right (as hoplites sought to remain behind the shield of their neighbour). The most experienced hoplites were often placed on the right side of the phalanx, to counteract these problems. According to Plutarch’s Sayings of Spartans, „a man carried a shield for the sake of the whole line“.
The phalanx is an example of a military formation in which single combat and other individualistic forms of battle were suppressed for the good of the whole. In earlier Homeric combat, the words and deeds of supremely powerful heroes turned the tide of battle. With his friends jostling and pushing on both sides and behind, and his enemies forming a solid wall in front of him, the hoplite had little opportunity for feats of technique and weapon skill, but great need for commitment and mental toughness. By forming a human wall to provide a powerful defensive armour, the Hoplites became invincible in the battlefield. The Hoplites were elite soldiers with much discipline and taught to be loyal and trustworthy. They had to trust their neighbours for mutual protection, so a phalanx was only as strong as its weakest elements. Its effectiveness depended on how well the hoplites could maintain this formation while in combat, and how well they could stand their ground, especially when engaged against another phalanx. The more disciplined and courageous the army, the more likely it was to win—often engagements between the various city-states of Greece would be resolved by one side fleeing before the battle.
Each hoplite provided his own equipment. Thus, only those who could afford such weaponry fought as hoplites; as with the Roman Republican army it was the middle classes who formed the bulk of the infantry. Equipment was not standardised, although there were doubtless trends in general designs over time, and between city-states. Hoplites had customized armour, the shield was decorated with family or clan emblems, although in later years these were replaced by symbols or monograms of the city states. The equipment might well be passed down in families, since it would have been expensive to manufacture.
The Hoplite army consisted of heavily armored infantrymen. Their armour, also called panoply, was made of full bronze, weighing nearly 32 kilograms (70 lb). The average farmer-peasant hoplite typically wore no armour, carrying only a shield, a spear, and perhaps a helmet plus a secondary weapon. Some hoplite spears were 2.7 metres (8 ft 10 in) long. The linothorax was the most popular type armour worn by the hoplites, since it was cost-effective and provided decent protection. The richer upper-class hoplites typically had a bronze cuirass of either the bell or muscled variety, a bronze helmet with cheekplates, as well as greaves and other armour. The design of the helmets used varied through time. The Corinthian helmet was at first standardised and was a very successful design. Later variants included the Chalcidian helmet, a lightened version of the Corinthian helmet, and the very simple Pilos helmet worn by the later hoplites. Often the helmet was decorated with one, sometimes more horsehair crests, and/or bronze animal horns and ears. Helmets were often painted as well. The Thracian helmet had a large visor to further increase protection. In later periods, linen breastplates called linothorax were used, as they were tougher and cheaper to make. The linen was 0.5-centimetre (0.20 in) thick. Hoplites carried a large concave shield called an aspis (often referred to as a hoplon) made from wood and covered in bronze, measuring roughly 1 metre in diameter and weighing about 16 pounds. This large shield was made possible partly by its shape, which allowed it to be supported on the shoulder. The revolutionary part of the shield was, in fact, the grip. Known as an Argive grip, it placed the handle at the edge of the shield, and was supported by a leather fastening (for the forearm) at the centre. These two points of contact eliminated the possibility of the shield swaying to the side after being struck, and as a result soldiers rarely lost their shields Billige Nike Fotball Jerseys online 2016. This allowed the hoplite soldier more mobility with the shield, as well as the ability to capitalize on its offensive capabilities and better support the Phalanx. It rested on a man’s shoulders, stretching down the knees. These large shields, designed for pushing ahead, were the most essential equipment for the Hoplites.
The main offensive weapon used was a 2.4–4.5-metre (7.9–14.8 ft) long and 2.5-centimetre (1 in) in diameter spear called a doru, or dory. It was held with the right hand, the other hand holding the hoplite’s shield. Soldiers usually held their spears in an underhand position when approaching but once they came into close contact with their opponents, they were held in an overhand position ready to strike. The spearhead was usually a curved leaf shape, while the rear of the spear had a spike called a sauroter („lizard-killer“) which was used to stand the spear in the ground (hence the name). It was also used as a secondary weapon if the main shaft snapped, or for the rear ranks to finish off fallen opponents as the phalanx advanced over them. In addition to being used as a secondary weapon, the sauroter also doubled to balance the spear, but not for throwing purposes. It is a matter of contention, among historians, whether the hoplite used the spear overarm or underarm. Held underarm, the thrusts would have been less powerful but under more control, and vice versa. It seems likely that both motions were used, depending on the situation. If attack was called for, an overarm motion was more likely to break through an opponent’s defence. The upward thrust is more easily deflected by armour due to its lesser leverage. However, when defending, an underarm carry absorbed more shock and could be ‚couched‘ under the shoulder for maximum stability. It should also be said that an overarm motion would allow more effective combination of the aspis and doru if the shield wall had broken down, while the underarm motion would be more effective when the shield had to be interlocked with those of one’s neighbours in the battle-line. Hoplites in the rows behind the lead would almost certainly have made overarm thrusts. The rear ranks held their spears underarm, and raised their shields upwards at increasing angles. This was an effective defence against missiles, deflecting their force.
Hoplites also carried a sword, mostly a short sword called a xiphos, but later also longer and heavier types. The short sword was a secondary weapon, used if or when their spears were broken or lost, or if the phalanx broke rank. The xiphos usually had a blade around 60 centimetres (24 in) long, however those used by the Spartans were often only 30–45 centimetres long. This very short xiphos would be very advantageous in the press that occurred when two lines of hoplites met, capable of being thrust through gaps in the shieldwall into an enemy’s unprotected groin or throat, while there was no room to swing a longer sword. Such a small weapon would be particularly useful after many hoplites had started to abandon body armour during the Peloponnesian War. Hoplites could also alternatively carry the kopis, a heavy knife with a forward-curving blade.
By contrast with hoplites, other contemporary infantry (e.g., Persian) tended to wear relatively light armour, use wicker shields, and were armed with shorter spears, javelins, and bows. The most famous are the Peltasts, light-armed troops who wore no armour and were armed with a light shield, javelins and a short sword. The Athenian general Iphicrates developed a new type of armour and arms for his mercenary army, which included light linen armour, smaller shields and longer spears, whilst arming his peltasts with larger shields, helmets and a longer spear, thus enabling them to defend themselves easier against enemy hoplites. With this new type of army he defeated a Spartan army in 392 BC. Nevertheless, most hoplites stuck to the traditional arms and armour.

Pfarrkirche Mureck

Die römisch-katholische Pfarrkirche Mureck steht am nordwestlichen Ortsrand der Stadt Mureck in der Steiermark. Die Pfarrkirche hl. Bartholomäus gehört zum Dekanat Radkersburg in der Diözese Graz-Seckau. Die Kirche steht unter 5391!Denkmalschutz.

Der untere Teil des Kirchturms zeigt die Jahresangabe 1519 2016 fußballschuh. Im 3. Viertel des 18. Jahrhunderts erfolgte ein Neubau. 1964/1965 erfolgte eine Innenrestaurierung

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, 1976 eine Außenrestaurierung.
Das fünfjochige Langhaus hat Wandpfeiler, zwischen denen Seitenkapellen mit Emporen angebaut sind. Über Doppelpilastern und einem kräftigen Gesims befindet sich ein tiefes Platzlgewölbe mit profilierten Gurten. Die Flachbogengesimse über den Emporenöffnungen haben eine stark rhythmische Wirkung. Der eingezogene dreijochige Chor weist im 1 Adidas Fußball Jerseys geben Verschiffen frei 2016. und 3. Joch ovale Flachkuppeln auf.
Die Einrichtung der Kirche stammt aus der Bauzeit. Den Hochaltar mit den Figuren schuf nach 1767 der Bildhauer Philipp Jakob Straub Billig Bogner Skijacke, das Altarbild malte der Maler J. V. Hauckh (1713) und die Orgel baute 1852 Alois Hörbiger.
46.70972815.769675Koordinaten: 46° 42′ 35″ N, 15° 46′ 11″ O

Ludi Taurii

I Ludi Taurii (giochi taurini, anche noti come Ludi Taurei e più raramente Taurilia) erano giochi (ludi) che si tenevano nell’antica Roma in onore degli „dei inferi“, gli dei del mondo dei morti. Questi giochi non facevano parte di una festa religiosa regolarmente programmata nel calendario, ma si tenevano come riti espiatori religionis causa, provocati cioè da preoccupazioni religiose.
I Ludi Taurii sono registrati nel 186 a.C. come un evento di due giorni. Varrone riporta che erano tenuti nella tarda Repubblica. Durante il regno di Antonino Pio si svolsero con cadenza quinquennale dal 140 al 160 d.C., all’interno di un periodo che iniziava il giorno dopo le idi di maggio e continuava fino alle calende di giugno. Alcuni studiosi deducono che come il lustro (rituale di purificazione), i Ludi Taurii erano regolarmente quinquennali. Altri ritengono, con maggiore cautela, che la ripetizione ogni 5 anni sotto Antonino Pio, attestata dai Fasti ostienses, non è mai menzionata in altre fonti. Le informazioni limitate suggeriscono che i Ludi Taurii erano importanti soprattutto nel contesto del revivalismo religioso proprio dei periodi di Augusto e di Antonino Pio.
I giochi taurini erano corse di cavalli, o meno probabilmente corse di carri, su un percorso a traguardi (metae). Nel XIX secolo, furono talvolta confusi con gli arcaici giochi tarentini (Ludi Tarentini), che furono sostituiti dai giochi secolari (Ludi Saeculares). Le corse dei cavalli e la propiziazione degli dei inferi erano caratteristiche di „vecchie e oscure“ feste romane, come le Consualia e l’October equus (il cavallo di ottobre), e si svolgevano nel Campo Marzio, in particolare nel Tarentum (dove i ludi Tarentini ebbero origine) e nel Trigarium. I Ludi Taurii erano gli unici giochi organizzati nel Circo Flaminio.
Se i giochi fossero di origine etrusca, come affermano Festo e Servio, allora taurii deriverebbe probabilmente dalla parola etrusca tauru („tomba“)

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. L’aspetto dei traguardi (metae) in un circo romano fu tratto dai monumenti funerari etruschi. Festo, tuttavia, propone anche un’etimologia basata sul termine latino taurus („toro“).
Nella tradizione registrata da Festo, i giochi furono istituiti nel periodo regio, quando Tarquinio il Superbo era re. Anche Servio colloca la loro origine sotto il suo regno.
Festo spiega che i giochi erano tenuti in onore degli dei inferi (di inferi). Essi furono istituiti in risposta ad una epidemia (magna … pestilentia) che colpiva le donne in stato di gravidanza, causata dalla distribuzione alla gente della carne di tori (tauri) sacrificati. Servio ipotizza che la pestilentia fosse mortalità infantile: „ogni parto delle donne aveva esito infausto“. Si dedusse che il rimedio fossero i giochi ex libris fatalibus, cioè dai libri del fato (non si sa se i libri sibillini o testi etruschi). Secondo Servio, i ludi furono così chiamati dalla parola taurea, che significava „vittima sacrificale sterile“ (hostia).
Servio fornisce anche una versione alternativa secondo la quale furono i Sabini ad istituire i giochi in risposta alla pestilentia e definisce il trasferimento della lues publica (l’epidemia che colpiva la gente) alle vittime sacrificali (hostiae) come se fosse un rituale di espiazione.
Festo forniva anche un’ulteriore spiegazione del nome derivandolo da taurus, „toro“, in accordo con quanto scritto da Varrone, conservato solamente in forma frammentaria dal Codex Farnesianus.
Una ricostruzione risalente a Giuseppe Giusto Scaligero è stata assunta ad indicare che i giovani, sotto la direzione di un istruttore, svolgevano una ginnastica rituale su una pelle grezza di toro, forse da confrontare con gli esercizi svolti su un trampolino. Questa opinione non ha incontrato una grande accettazione, ma suggerirebbe che l’azione rituale si contrapponga alla mortalità infantile affermando l’idoneità della gioventù. Dal punto di vista del rito

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Lo storico di età augustea Livio cita brevemente i giochi riportando che si svolsero nel 186 a.C. per biduum, cioè per un periodo di due giorni, religionis causa, cioè per rito religioso. In questa occasione, i due giorni di Ludi Taurii precedettero dieci giorni di ludi dati da Marco Fulvio Nobiliore in ottemperanza al voto fatto nel corso della guerra etolica. I giochi di Nobiliore sono celebri in quanto per la prima volta si tenne a Roma uno spettacolo di caccia (venatio). Una parte del testo tra i due eventi manca adidas sconto cap negozio online, ma si incontra la parola „dieci“, che Georg Wissowa ricostruì facendola riferire al collegio di dieci uomini dei decemviri sacris faciundis; egli sostiene che questi sacerdoti fossero incaricati anche dell’organizzazione dei ludi Taurii.
Molti studiosi in passato hanno spesso sostenuto che l’aggettivo „taurii“ indicasse la presenza di tori nei giochi, seguendo le tradizionali tauromachie o taurocatapsie di origine mediterranea. Poiché la cronologia di Livio pone i Ludi Taurii subito dopo l’annuncio di una vittoria romana in Spagna, altri storici hanno provato a correlarli con gli antichi combattimenti di tori della cultura spagnola.

2004 CIS football season

The 2004 CIS football season began on September 2, 2004, and concluded with the 40th Vanier Cup national championship on November 27 at Ivor Wynne Stadium in Hamilton, Ontario, with the Laval Rouge et Or winning their third championship and second consecutive. Twenty-seven universities across Canada competed in CIS football this season, the highest level of amateur play in Canadian football, under the auspices of Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS).

Note: GP = Games Played

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, W = Wins Bogner Outlet bijn, L = Losses, OTL = Overtime Losses, PF = Points For, PA = Points Against, Pts = Points
Teams in bold have earned playoff berths.
NR = Not Ranked.
The Vanier Cup is played between the champions of the Mitchell Bowl and the Uteck Bowl, the national semi-final games

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. In 2005, according to the rotating schedule 2016 adidas soccer equipment online store, the winners of the Canada West conference Hardy Trophy meet the winners of the Atlantic conference Loney Bowl championship for the Mitchell Bowl. The Ontario conference’s Yates Cup championship team travels to the Dunsmore Cup Quebec champion for the Uteck Bowl.

Battle of Agbeluvhoe

 British Empire
 German Empire
The Battle of Beleaguer (or Agbéluvhoé or Agbeluwoe), also known as the Battle of Tsewie

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, was fought during the First World War between invading British Empire soldiers of the West African Rifles and German troops in German Togoland (now Togo) on 15 August 1914.[Note 1] British troops at the Togolese capital Lomé on the coast, had advanced towards a wireless station at Kamina, 100 miles (160 km) inland on hills near Atakpame. The only routes inland were by the railway and road, which had been built through dense and almost impassable jungle. Two trains full of German troops steamed south to engage the British and delay the Anglo-French invasion but were ambushed at Agbulovhoe, suffered heavy losses and fled, leaving 30 miles (48 km) of railway to the north intact. After a halt of three days to accumulate supplies, the British advance resumed, with support from French Tirailleurs Sénégalais. The German colonial forces were capable of only one more defensive action at the Battle of Chra on 22 August. The wireless transmitter at Kamina was blown up on the night of 24/25 August and the colony was surrendered the next day.

An Offensive Sub-Committee of the British Committee of Imperial Defence was appointed on 5 August and established a principle that command of the seas was to be ensured. Territorial objectives were considered if they could be attained with local forces and if the objective assisted the priority of maintaining British sea communications, as British army garrisons abroad were returned to Europe in an „Imperial Concentration“. Attacks on German coaling stations and wireless stations were considered to be important, to clear the seas of German commerce raiders. Objectives at Tsingtau, Luderitz Bay, Windhoek, Duala and Dar-es-Salaam were considered and a German wireless station in Togoland, next to the British colony of Gold Coast in the Gulf of Guinea, was considered vulnerable to attack by local forces. The high-power wireless transmitter had been built at Kamina and controlled German communication in the Atlantic Ocean, by linking a German transmitter at Nauen near Berlin with German colonies in west Africa and south America. At the outbreak of war, the German acting-Governor of Togoland, who had 152 paramilitary police, 416 local police and 125 border guards but no regular army forces, had proposed neutrality to the British and French colonial authorities under the Congo Act 1885 and then withdrawn from Lomé and the coastal region, when the British demanded unconditional surrender. The acting-Governor, Major Hans-Georg von Döring had sent an uncoded wireless message to Berlin disclosing his plan to retreat to Kamina, which had been intercepted and led to offensive operations against Kamina being authorised by the Colonial Office on 9 August. Anglo-French expeditions from northern Dahomey

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, Nigeria and the Gold Coast began on 12 August.
On 6 August 1914, the British and French governments summoned the German authorities in Togoland to surrender; Anglo-French forces invaded the colony and occupied Lomé unopposed on 7 August and by 12 August, the southern portion of the colony was under Anglo-French control. In northern Togoland British and French troops, police and irregulars occupied Yendi and Sansane Mangu on 14 August. In the south, the Polizeitruppen had withdrawn to the wireless station at Kamina

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, about 100 kilometres (62 mi) inland. As British and French forces advanced towards Kamina, the German commanders, acting-Governor Major Hans-Georg von Döring and the military commander, Captain Georg Pfähler attempted to delay the Allied advances by blowing bridges. The main British and French thrusts came from the south, where well built roads and railways from the coast made transport easy for both sides. To harass the West African Rifles of the West African Frontier Force (WAAF), German commanders filled two trains with c. 200 German soldiers and sent them south to raid the Allies on 15 August 1914.
By 14 August the British had reached Tsevie unopposed and patrols reported the country south of Agbeluvhoe clear of German forces. The main British force assembled at Togblekove and „I“ Company was sent forward by road to Agbeluvhoe, followed by the main body on 15 August. When the main force reached Dawie, civilians reported that a train full of Germans had shot up the station at Tsevie earlier that morning. At Tsevie the British found that the train had steamed north and hurried on to support „I“ Company. „I“ Company had heard the train run south at 4:00 a.m. while halted on the road near Ekuni. A section was sent to cut off the train and the rest of „I“ Company pressed on to Agbeluvhoe. A local civilian guided the section to the railway, where Lieutenant Collins and his men piled stones and a heavy iron plate on the tracks, about 200 yards (180 m) north of the bridge at Ekuni, a village about 6 miles (9.7 km) south of Agbeluvhoe and then set an ambush. A second train, carrying Captain Georg Pfähler, commander of the German forces in Togoland, stopped in front of the obstacle and managed to reverse before the ambushers reached it. The rest of „I“ Company had heard the train pass, set another ambush and riddled the engine with bullets as it travelled past at full steam. The British parties rendezvoused and advanced to Agbeluvhoe, where another road and rail block was established. Both trains were south of Agbeluvhoe and the convoy of carriers with „I“ Company’s supplies was harassed by German attacks for two hours before they arrived at the British position. The position at Agbeluvhoe had been attacked several times from the south and more attacks overnight were repulsed. As the main British force drew close

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, the Germans retired on their train and eventually surrendered.
The main force under Colonel Bryant had been engaged by a German party on the afternoon of 15 August at the Lila river, where the Germans blew the bridge and then retired to a ridge where they fought a delaying action, which held up the British until 4:30 pm. Three German dead were left behind and the British lost one man killed and three wounded. When the advance resumed the British reached Ekuni and found twenty railway carriages, which had been derailed by the obstruction near the bridge.[Note 2] Next morning Baron Cordelli von Fahnenfeldt, who had designed the wireless station at Kamina and the German explosives expert were captured and the column set off for Agbeluvhoe, no news having arrived from „I“ Company. Slight opposition was met half-way to the station and much abandoned equipment was found. Firing was heard until about 1-mile (1.6 km) from Agbeluvhoe, where most of the c. 200 German troops from the trains were found to have surrendered, along with two trains, wagons, a machine-gun, rifles and much ammunition. The Germans who escaped proved too demoralised to conduct demolitions and 30 miles (48 km) of track were captured. The British lost six killed and 35 wounded, some of whom had wounds which raised suspicions that the Germans had used soft-nosed bullets, which was later discovered to have been partly true, as some hurriedly incorporated reservists had used their civilian ammunition.
The Germans lost a quarter of their troops in the attempt to harass British forces to the south, by using the railway. It was considered a great failure and defeat for the Germans in Togoland. Although it may briefly have delayed the British northward advance, which was not resumed until 19 August, the Battle of Agbeluvhoe had no lasting effect on the advance of the Allies. The wireless station at Kamina was demolished by the Germans, which cut off German ships in the south Atlantic from communication with Europe and influenced the Battle of the Falkland Islands (8 December). The acting Governor of the colony, Major Hans-Georg von Döring surrendered eleven days after the battle, on 26 August 1914. The German force of c. 1,500 men in one German and seven local companies, had been expected to be most difficult to defeat, given the Togolese terrain and the extensive entrenchments at Kamina. A German prisoner later wrote that few of the Germans had military training, the defences of Kamina had been too large for the garrison to defend and were ringed by hills. The Germans were not able to obtain information about the British in the neighbouring Gold Coast (Ghana) and instructions by wireless from Berlin only insisted that the transmitting station be protected. In the first three weeks of August, the transmitter had passed 229 messages from Nauen to German colonies and German shipping. Defence of the transmitter had wider operational effects but Von Döring made no attempt at a protracted resistance.
The British had c. 83 casualties and the German forces had c. 41 casualties at the Battle of Agbeluvhoe.
On 22 August the Battle of Chra was fought by the Anglo-French invaders and the Germans on the Chra River and in Chra village. The German forces had dug in and repulsed the Anglo-French attack. A new attack on 23 August found that the Germans has retired further inland to Kamina. By the end of the campaign, six of seven provinces had been abandoned by the Germans, bridges had not been blown and only the Chra river line of the three possible water obstacles had been defended. The speed of the invasion by several British and French columns, whose size was over-estimated and lack of local support for the colonial regime, had been insuperable obstacles for the German colonialists. Togoland was occupied by the British and French for the duration of the war.
Coordinates: 6°39.57′N 1°10.04′E / 6.65950°N 1.16733°E / 6.65950; 1.16733

The Voice Chile

The Voice Chile is a Chilean reality talent show that premiered on Canal 13 in 2015. Based on the reality singing competition The Voice of Holland, the series was created by Dutch television producer John de Mol.

The series is part of The Voice franchise and is based on a similar competition format in the Netherlands entitled The Voice of Holland won by Ben Saunders. The Chilean series is hosted by Sergio Lagos with Jean Philippe Cretton serving as the backstage and social networking correspondent. The winner will receive a record deal with Universal Republic.
The series consists of three phases: a blind audition, a battle phase, and live performance shows. Four judges/coaches, all noteworthy recording artists, choose teams of contestants through a blind audition process. Each judge has the length of the auditioner’s performance (about one minute) to decide if he or she wants that singer on his or her team; if two or more judges want the same singer (as happens frequently), the singer has the final choice of coach.
Each team of singers is mentored and developed by its respective coach. In the second stage 2016 Adidas fotball utstyr online, called the battle phase Billige Nike Fotball Jerseys online 2016, coaches have two of their team members battle against each other directly by singing the same song together, with the coach choosing which team member to advance from each of individual „battles“ into the first live round 2016 Adidas fotball utstyr online. Within that first live round, the surviving four acts from each team again compete head-to-head, with public votes determining one of two acts from each team that will advance to the final eight, while the coach chooses which of the remaining three acts comprises the other performer remaining on the team.
In the final phase, the remaining contestants compete against each other in live broadcasts. The television audience and the coaches have equal say 50/50 in deciding who moves on to the final 4 phase. With one team member remaining for each coach, the (final 4) contestants compete against each other in the finale with the outcome decided solely by public vote.
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Katō Shūson

Katō Shūson (jap. 加藤 楸邨; * 26. Mai 1905 in Tōkyō; † 3. Juli 1993), eigentlich Katō Takeo (加藤 健雄), war ein japanischer Haiku-Dichter und Literaturwissenschaftler (japanische Literatur). Seine Ehefrau war die Haiku-Dichterin Katō Chiyoko.

Katō Shūson wurde in Kitasenzoku, Tōkyō, heute das Gebiet Kitasenzoku im Tōkyōter Stadtbezirk Ōta, geboren. Die Anmeldung der Geburt erfolgte wegen plötzlicher Versetzung des Vaters, eines Eisenbahnbeamten bogner fire and ice, jedoch in der Stadt Ōtsuki. Da später weitere Versetzungen folgten, lebte Shūson im Laufe seiner Jugend in den Regionen Kantō, Tōhoku und Hokuriku der japanischen Hauptinsel Honshū. Als der Vater 1921 in den Ruhestand versetzt wurde 2016 billige Fußball Nike Strumpf, zog die Familie nach Kanazawa, der Heimatstadt der Mutter. Dort setzte Shūson die bereits begonnene Schulausbildung an der Ersten Mittelschule (heute: Oberschule Kanazawa-Izumigaoka) fort 2016 fußball trikots.
1923 schloss er die Mittelschule ab und wurde für zwei Jahre Hilfslehrer an der Grundschule Mattō. (Die Stadt Mattō, in der die Schule lag, ist heute Teil von Hakusan.)
In dieser Zeit entwickelte Shūson ein Interesse an der Tanka-Dichtung, insbesondere an den Werken Ishikawa Takubokus oder solchen, die aus der sogenannten Araragi-Schule, benannt nach der gleichnamigen Zeitschrift für Tanka.
1925 verlor er seinen Vater durch an eine Krankheit und zog daraufhin mit der gesamten Familie nach Tōkyō. 1926 besuchte er die Fakultät für Japanologie und klassische chinesische Literatur der höheren pädagogischen Schule (einer Vorläuferin der heutigen Tsukuba-Universität).
1929 beendete er seine dortige Ausbildung und wurde Lehrer an der Mittelschule Kasukabe. Gleichen Jahres heiratete er Yano Chiyose, die spätere Haiku-Dichterin Katō Chiyoko Bogner Online Shop. 1931 begann er auf Vorschlag eines Lehrerkollegen, Haiku zu schreiben, und veröffentlichte diese in der von Mizuhara Shūōshi herausgegebenen Zeitschrift Ashibi. Zugleich wurde er Schüler Shūōshis. 1935 wurde er in den Kreis der Ashibi-Zeitschrift aufgenommen.
1937 gab er seine Lehrertätigkeit an der Mittelschule auf und zog abermals mit seiner Familie nach Tōkyō. Dort begann er ein Studium an der Fakultät für Japanologie der geistes- und naturwissenschaftlichen Universität (die später wie die zuvor besuchte Anstalt zur Tsukuba-Universität wurde) und arbeitete gleichzeitig auf Empfehlung Shūōshis im Verlagshaus der Ashibi-Zeitschrift.
1940 schloss er das Studium ab, wurde Lehrer an der Achten Tōkyōter Mittelschule (heute die Oberschule Koyamadai) und gründete die Haiku-Zeitschrift Kanrai (寒雷). Von der Ashibi-Zeitschrift zog er sich 1942 zurück.
1944 begab er sich mit anderen Dichtern wie Tsuchiya Bummei nach China und schrieb Haiku auf dem Schauplatz des Krieges. Die ruhende Herausgabe der Zeitschrift Kanrai nahm er im August des Jahres 1946 wieder auf. Durch seine „Kriegsgedichte“ geriet er in die Kritik, da diese eine unterstützende Haltung dem kaiserlichen japanischen Hauptquartier gegenüber bezweifeln ließen.
1954 wurde er Professor am Aoyama-Gakuin-Juniorcollege der Frauen (青山学院女子短期大学, Aoyama-gakuin joshi tanki daigaku) und blieb dort bis zum Jahre 1974.
1968 wurde seine Haiku-Sammlung Maboroshi no shika mit dem Dakotsu-Preis gewürdigt. 1986 verstarb seine Frau Chiyose. In Anerkennung seine Forschungsarbeit zu Matsuo Bashō, die er seit Mitte des Zweiten Weltkrieges vorangetrieben hatte, erhielt er die Medaille am violetten Bande, den Orden des Heiligen Schatzes dritter Klasse sowie den Asahi-Preis.
Zu Beginn des Jahres 1993 musste er ins Krankenhaus eingeliefert werden und verstarb am 3. Juli desselben Jahres. Katō Shūson wurde 88 Jahre alt.

Piazza della Rotonda

The Piazza della Rotonda is a piazza (city square) in Rome, Italy, on the south side of which is located the Pantheon. The square gets its name from the Pantheon’s informal title as the church of Santa Maria Rotonda.

Although the Pantheon has stood from antiquity, the area in front of it had over the centuries become choked with a maze of sheds and small shops that had grown up around its columns. These medieval accretions were cleared by order of Pope Eugenius IV (1431–39) and the piazza was laid out and paved. It took its name from the Pantheon, which had been converted in the 7th century AD into a Christian church dedicated to „St. Mary and the Martyrs“ but informally known as Santa Maria Rotonda. The piazza is roughly rectangular, approximately 60 meters north to south and 40 meters east to west, with a fountain and obelisk in the center and the Pantheon on the south side.
During the 19th century, the piazza was especially noted for its market of bird-sellers, who brought their cages with live parrots, nightingales, owls, and other birds into the piazza. A traveler in 1819 remarked that during Twelfth Night celebrations in Rome the Piazza della Rotonda was „in particular distinguished by the gay appearance of the fruit and cake-stalls, dressed with flowers and lighted with paper lanterns.“
Charlotte Anne Eaton, an English traveller who visited in 1820, was much less impressed with the piazza and deplored how a visitor would find himself „surrounded by all that is most revolting to the senses, distracted by incessant uproar, pestered with a crowd of clamorous beggars, and stuck fast in the congregated filth of every description that covers the slippery pavement … Nothing resembling such a hole as this could exist in England; nor is it possible that an English imagination can conceive a combination of such disgusting dirt, such filthy odours and foul puddles, such as that which fills the vegetable market in the Piazza della Rotonda at Rome.“ An 1879 Baedeker guidebook noted that the „busy scene“ of the piazza „affords the stranger opportunities of observing the characteristics of the peasantry.“
Its present appearance was threatened with destruction under the French administration of 1809-1814, when Napoleon signed decrees calling for the demolition of the buildings around the Pantheon. The short life of French rule in Rome meant that the scheme never went ahead but it re-emerged in an altered form in the urban plan of 1873. This scheme proposed that the piazza should be enlarged and made into the focus of new boulevards converging on it from the direction of Piazza Borghese and Largo Magnanapoli. In the event, this did not happen, though several structures adjoining the north end of the square and the Pantheon were demolished under Popes Pius VII and Pius IX 2016 chanel online.
In the center of the piazza is a fountain, the Fontana del Pantheon, surmounted by an Egyptian obelisk. The fountain was constructed by Giacomo Della Porta under Pope Gregory XIII in 1575, and the obelisk was added to it in 1711 under Pope Clement XI.
The Aqua Virgo 2016 perfumes dior, one of the eleven aqueducts that supplied ancient Rome with drinking water, served the area of the Campus Martius, but had fallen into disrepair and disuse by the late Middle Ages. It was reconstructed under Pope Nicholas V and consecrated in 1453 as the Acqua Vergine. In 1570, Giacomo della Porta was commissioned under Pope Gregory XIII to oversee a major project to extend the distribution of water from the Vergine to eighteen new public fountains.
Construction of the fountain in the Piazza della Rotonda was authorized on September 25, together with a fountain for Piazza Colonna, and two more for Piazza Navona; the fountain for the Rotonda 2016 prada outlet, completed in 1575, was of a chalice-type design, around 3.5 to 4 meters in height, and fed with the Vergine water through a terracotta conduit. Della Porta designed the fountain, and Leonardo Sormani executed it. Due to the slope of the piazza, the fountain is approached by five steps on the south side, and only two on the north.
Under the pontificate of Alexander VII Chigi, projects were set afoot to systematize the piazza and its setting, grading and enlarging it and widening the incident streets 2016 prada bolsos, in which Gian Lorenzo Bernini participated. An engraving by Giovanni Battista Falda records the work that had been completed at the time of Alexander’s death in 1667.
In 1711, the fountain was given its current appearance when Pope Clement XI had the Late Baroque sculptor Filippo Barigioni top it with a 20-foot red marble Egyptian obelisk. The obelisk, originally constructed by Pharaoh Ramses II for the Temple of Ra in Heliopolis, had been brought to Rome in ancient times where it was reused in the Iseum Campense, a shrine to the Egyptian god Isis that stood to the southeast of the Pantheon. It was rediscovered in 1374 underneath the apse of the nearby Basilica of Santa Maria sopra Minerva. In the mid-15th century, the obelisk had been erected in the small Piazza di San Macuto some 200 meters east of the Pantheon, where it remained until its 1711 move to the Piazza della Rotonda. It is still called the Obelisco Macutèo after its previous location.
Coordinates: 41°53′57.5″N 12°28′36.3″E / 41.899306°N 12.476750°E / 41.899306; 12.476750

Carl August Brentano-Mezzegra

Carl August Brentano-Mezzegra, auch Karl August von Brentano, (* 28 nike soccer Ausrüstungen Online-Shop 2016. August 1817 in Augsburg; † 16. September 1896 in München) war ein deutscher Seidenfabrikant.
Brentano besuchte die Technische Universität Wien und trat in das Familienunternehmen „Seidenmanufaktur Pelloux & Brentano“ ein, das Mitte der 1780er Jahre von den Brüder Anton und Carl Brentano-Mezzegra, Nachfahren einer aus Italien stammenden Familie von Seidenhändlern

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1847 rief Brentano den „Kreis-Frauen-Verein zur Beförderung der Seidenzucht“ ins Leben und engagierte sich dort über viele Jahre als Sekretär. Er war zudem beratendes Mitglied und Referent des Kreis-Seidenbau-Vereines. Des Weiteren befand sich Brentano im Range eines Oberstleutnants Distrikts-Inspektor der Landwehr im Regierungsbezirk Schwaben und Neuburg billige adidas Fußball Jerseys. Carl August Brentano wurde 1846 in den erblichen Adelsstand erhoben.
Im November 1848 war Brentano Mitbegründer des „Konstitutionell-monarchische Vereins“. Aus diesem Umfeld entstanden 1849 der Piusverein in Augsburg, die zu den Katholischen Vereinen Deutschlands gehörte. Brentano engagierte sich hier besonders während der Revolution 1848/49. Er war Abgeordneter für Augsburg und Aschaffenburg der Generalversammlung der Katholischen Vereine.
Carl August Brentano stellte zusammen mit dem Juristen und Publizisten Moritz Lieber das Präsidium des zweiten Deutschen Katholikentages vom 9. bis 12. Mai 1849 in Breslau.